reVISION Plan Review - PROJECT COMPLETE

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Consultation has concluded

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NOTE: PROJECT NOW COMPLETE - After almost five years of public consultation, committee meetings, writing and re-writing, the Municipality has prepared final drafts of two new documents: the Municipal Planning Strategy and the Land Use By-law — which will shape the way that our communities grow over the next 20 years. These documents have policies and regulations dealing with the environment, the economy, heritage and community character, housing, and social and physical health.

Read More in the document library on the right.

Zoning is one tool used to achieve the outcomes detailed in the Municipal Planning Strategy. Zones determine what can be built where, and what the approval process is for certain types of development. All areas of the Municipality will see some change to zoning rules.

Municipal Council has now given 1st Reading to the new documents at a meeting held on October 24, 2019. Council has also set a date for a Public Hearing: November 25, 2019, beginning at 7:00 p.m. at Forest Heights Community School. The Public Hearing is the last opportunity to tell us whether or not you agree with the new documents. Written submissions will be accepted for the Public Hearing but must be submitted no later than 4:30 p.m. on November 18, 2019 to the Municipal Clerk (pmyra@chester.ca) or phone 902-275-3554.

Council may vote to adopt the documents following the Public Hearing.

Visit the Interactive Map to find your current and proposed zoning.

Click here to contact us if you need help with the map

NOTE: PROJECT NOW COMPLETE - After almost five years of public consultation, committee meetings, writing and re-writing, the Municipality has prepared final drafts of two new documents: the Municipal Planning Strategy and the Land Use By-law — which will shape the way that our communities grow over the next 20 years. These documents have policies and regulations dealing with the environment, the economy, heritage and community character, housing, and social and physical health.

Read More in the document library on the right.

Zoning is one tool used to achieve the outcomes detailed in the Municipal Planning Strategy. Zones determine what can be built where, and what the approval process is for certain types of development. All areas of the Municipality will see some change to zoning rules.

Municipal Council has now given 1st Reading to the new documents at a meeting held on October 24, 2019. Council has also set a date for a Public Hearing: November 25, 2019, beginning at 7:00 p.m. at Forest Heights Community School. The Public Hearing is the last opportunity to tell us whether or not you agree with the new documents. Written submissions will be accepted for the Public Hearing but must be submitted no later than 4:30 p.m. on November 18, 2019 to the Municipal Clerk (pmyra@chester.ca) or phone 902-275-3554.

Council may vote to adopt the documents following the Public Hearing.

Visit the Interactive Map to find your current and proposed zoning.

Click here to contact us if you need help with the map

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

We invite you to ask your questions here.

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    After the November 25 Public Hearing, when would the Council vote on 2nd reading? What other steps remain before the new documents become law? Once they have been adopted, when will they come into effect? Thanks!

    Brian Gifford asked 11 months ago

    Hi Brian,

    Great questions! Following the Public Hearing, Council may vote at any time to adopt the new planning documents. This could occur on Nov. 25th immediately following the hearing, or Council may choose to wait until a future Council meeting to vote on the documents. The choice is Council's to make on when to vote. 

    If Council adopts the documents, there are a number of procedural steps that must be taken before they become effective. This includes sending the documents to the Province for a review, which can take up to 90 days in total to receive a response. 

    Once we have confirmation that the Provincial review is complete, an advertisement will be placed in the Progress Bulletin to give notice that the documents are in effect. While it is difficult to estimate the timeline, I would hope that the documents will become effective early in 2020. 

    If you have any further questions, please do let us know.

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    Can you explain to me how "dwelling Unit" is defined or measured in say 6.3.1 Residential. Is it a building, a family group, a civic number or a cooking facility?

    Colin Finlay asked over 2 years ago

    Hi Colin,

    In Section 6.3.1, when the By-law states 1-2 dwelling units are permitted on a lot, this could be either: two single unit houses on the same lot or a duplex (or other type of two unit building).

    The Land Use By-law definition is: Dwelling Unit - means one or more habitable rooms that may be used as a residence by an independent, separate household, which: has a bathroom for exclusive use of the household; has a kitchen for the exclusive use of the household; and has a private entrance from outside the building or from a common hallway or stairway.  


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    I noticed on the interactive map that the large protected area close to Deep Cove (see link provided below) owned by the Nature Conservatory of Nova Scotia is not marked as "Conservation" on the map. Was this an over sight or a change? Could the zoning by the Municipality impact this Nature Reserve if it is not considered "Conservation" by the zoning/municipality? http://www.natureconservancy.ca/en/where-we-work/nova-scotia/featured-projects/deep_cove.html

    TerriWhetstone asked over 2 years ago

    Hi Terri, 

    Great question! Currently the Conservation Zone has only been proposed for Municipally owned properties. With that said, if a landowner or group were to approach Council and request that the Conservation Zone be applied to a specific piece of privately owned property, that could certainly be considered. The zoning of the property will only affect what potentially could be developed on the site. The property owner would have final say over whether any development takes place regardless of what the Land Use By-law states is permitted on the site.